I can’t stand the term passive recreation area.  Common “passive recreation” pursuits are wildlife observation, walking, biking, snowshoeing, and canoeing, and a “passive recreation area” is typically defined as undeveloped space or an environmentally sensitive area.  I probably just dropped a whole lot of knowledge on you there.  Before I started working in the parks and recreation field, I didn’t know there was a difference between “active” and “passive recreation,” so I wouldn’t be surprised if you didn’t either.  I didn’t know recreational pursuits were categorized this way.  And they shouldn’t be. Let’s look more at what some common “passive”

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Play is serious.  Bet you’ve never considered that as a fact.  How can play be serious?  Isn’t play just play? Play is a universal language.  So yes, play should be simple.  Yes, play should be easy.  However, in today’s fast-paced, high-pressure world, things aren’t always as easy as they should be.  We need reasons why we should be doing things, data to back up and prove those reasons, and the time, energy, and commitment to do those things.  And play is one of those things.   So, it’s time to get serious about play. The Three Things That Make Play Easy

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Every year thousands and thousands of children participate in youth sports.  Parents pack their minivans with their children and teammates, chairs for the sideline, and a cooler full of snacks and drinks and drive to the field or court.  Parents sign up their kids to play sports for a variety of reasons.  Maybe they played the sport as a child, or the child saw the sport on TV and wanted to play.  Or perhaps the child’s sibling plays the sport.   Sometimes the child just has a lot of energy that he or she needs to burn off.  Whatever the reason

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It’s the start of a new season, and your child wants to try to play a new sport, or continue playing the one he or she has been playing in the past.   So, you go online, register, enter your credit card information, and just like that, little Timmy or Suzie is all set for another season.  Why do kids want to play sports?  What do parents hope kids get out of sports?  How should leagues and programs be structured? So many times, we as parents, coaches, and administrators are caught up in the “now.”  “My kid needs to become better

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Look around any youth sports field or court and you’ll find a melting pot of different ages; experience, interest, and knowledge levels; fathers; mothers; grandparents; siblings; and volunteers.  These are the people who coach youth sports.  Basically, anyone with an interest to help kids learn the game.  One of the imperfect perfections of the youth sport experience is the vast array of different coaches.  Each year, a child will have a different coach, each with his or her own unique style, expertise, and philosophies.   Of course, parents always want their child to have the best coach and experience possible.  How

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